Renovation and Addition to Historic Druid Hills Home

948 Lullwater Road

Construction by Revival Construction, Inc.

Project Manager – Brian O’Herron

Architectural Design by Norman Davenport Askins Architect

Project Architect – Michelle Moody

Landscape Design by Richard Anderson Landscape Architect

Street view of 948 Lullwater Road not long after its completion, image from Georgia’s Homes and Notable Georgians.

Street view of 948 Lullwater Road not long after its completion, image from Georgia’s Homes and Notable Georgians.

View of the rear patio with carriage house and gardens in the background.

View of the rear patio with carriage house and gardens in the background.

A complete renovation and addition project of 948 Lullwater Road was recently completed, restoring the home to its original splendor. The architectural firm of Ivey and Crook designed the home in 1929 for John Howard Candler, the grandson of Asa Griggs Candler, Sr. of Coca-Cola fame.

Front elevation drawn in 1929

Front elevation drawn in 1929

Rear elevation drawn in 1929

Rear elevation drawn in 1929

Lewis “Buck” Crook was the primary designer for the project, job #221. Crook’s initials are on all of the remaining drawings, and the house seems to have been built as designed. 

The house was one of the many homes built for the Candler family in Druid Hills and one of the three Ivey and Crook designs on Lullwater Road. Ivey and Crook was perhaps the most influential firm to work in Druid Hills, designing fifteen residences, over forty buildings on the Emory University campus, Druid Hills High School, and Druid Hills Methodist Church. One of the most prominent commissions was “Lullwater House” that was designed for Walter Turner Candler, John’s uncle, and that now serves as the Emory president’s house.

In 2011, the current owners hired the firm of Norman Davenport Askins to design an addition and renovate areas in the existing house.  The addition can be seen below in Askin’s drawing.

2011 front elevation drawn by Norman Davenport Askins.

2011 front elevation drawn by Norman Davenport Askins.

2011 rear elevation.

2011 rear elevation.

The addition includes a family room, mudroom, powder room, and hall on the first floor. The new basement addition includes a large media room, gym, and project room. The second floor includes a new play area and closet.

Before the 2013 renovation and addition.

Before the 2013 renovation and addition.

Street view after the 2013 renovation and addition.

Street view after the 2013 renovation and addition.

Close up of the addition on the right side of the house.

Close up of the addition on the right side of the house.

The side sunroom was the inspiration for the new family room addition. The Ivey and Crook drawings show the sunroom as an open porch, but the arches were glassed at some point. The same triple arched pattern was applied to the family room addition. The arches were also used on both walls of the interior of the family room, one side with glass and the other with antique mirror.

A close up of the original sunroom.

A close up of the original sunroom.

Family room addition

Family room addition

The brick wall that enclosed the patio had to be rebuilt due to the family room addition, and the brick paving was replaced with bluestone laid in a large running bond pattern.

View of back patio

View of back patio

Building the addition with a full height basement was no small task. A large granite retaining wall was built along the property line, and the corner of the house had to be supported while the basement foundation was built.

A 12 foot trench was dug to make room for the new  basement addition.

A 12 foot trench was dug to make room for the new basement addition.

The corner of the house had to be supported while the basement foundation was built.

The corner of the house had to be supported while the basement foundation was built.

The granite retaining wall.

The granite retaining wall.

The landscape restoration project is still underway and should be completed in early fall 2013.


Please check back for Part II of this post where we will share the interior images.

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